Please Note:

Elective courses are subject to change.

Spring2016

A)JSP Elective Courses:

  • (1) Contemporary Social Issues in Japan (2 credits)
    IWASAKI Akio
    13:10-14:40 (Tuesday – Friday) 1st quarter only (April 11-June 1)

    This course is designed to give you an intriguing opportunity to observe certain delicate social incidents taking place in contemporary Japanese society. In the course we will explore and question what 'Japaneseness' is all about from sociological viewpoints. By using Japan as a mirror to study the self, Japanese students will be able to reconfirm their national and ethnic identity, while international students should perceive how their 'foreignness' is portrayed in this homogeneous society, leading you to reflect more of the positive values taken for granted in your own country.

  • (2) Japanese Religions (4 credits)
    DROTT Edward
    13:10-14:40 & 14:50-16:20 (Tuesday)

    This course traces the development and cultural impact of the diverse religious traditions of Japan. It will focus on the role that folk traditions, Buddhism, Shintō and New Religious Movements have had in the formation of Japanese culture, as well as the ways in which these traditions have adapted to the unique social and historical circumstances found in Japan.

  • (3) Survey of Japanese Art (4 credits)
    TATENO Marimi
    13:10-14:40 & 14:50-16:20 (Tuesday)

    This course surveys selected works of the pre-modern periods of Japan from the seventh through the eighteenth centuries. We will analyze the major works of painting, sculpture, and architecture that epitomize each historical period. Discussions focus on the subjects of works, including examination of how concepts were translated into visual forms as well as the socio-cultural functions of the works. Students are expected to gain basic skills in iconographical observation of art works of Japan and to acquire proper terminology for discussing Japanese art. Students should gain a better understanding of Japanese art and basic information that will prepare them for further study in the field of art history.

  • (4) The Soft Power of Cool Japan (4 credits)
    CLOSE Natalie
    13:10-14:40 & 14:50-16:20 (Thursday)

    In 2010 the Japanese government formally implemented a strategy called ‘Cool Japan’, which aims at increasing Japan’s influence in the world through a process known as soft power. This course will investigate how this strategy developed and was eventually adopted by the government. We will look into the various forms of Cool Japan including anime, manga, gaming, and fashion, as well as some of the less well-known areas from a historical perspective. In addition, we will look at the contemporary status of popular culture both in Japan and globally, critically examine the success of the Cool Japan program, and discuss what the future may hold. Overall, this course will raise students’ critical awareness of a variety of cultural and social issues related to modern Japan in the 21st century.

  • (5) Tradition and Innovation in Japanese Culture (4 credits)
    ŌTA Tomoki
    14:50-16:20 & 16:30-18:00 (Wednesday)

    The aim of this class is to provide a broad overview of Japan's traditional and contemporary culture. During the first half of the course, we will look at the manufacture of pottery, kabuki theatre, gagaku (traditional Japanese music), matsuri (local festivals), folk customs relating to the seasons, and other aspects of traditional culture. In the latter half of the course we will tackle contemporary culture, with a focus on anime and manga; we will also look at contemporary art and gyaru/yankee culture. Throughout the course, we will examine examples of collaboration between traditional and contemporary culture, from Hatsune Miku and bunraku theatre, to Louis Vuitton lacquerware. We shall consider how traditions have been preserved in Japanese culture—and how contemporary innovations have been made—and the sort of problems that arise in this context. This class makes use of film and photography, and involves the viewing of anime and works of contemporary art.

B)E-Track Japan Studies Elective Courses open to JSP students:

The E-Track Program is an English based 4 year undergraduate degree program, with majors in International Relations (IR) and Business-Economics (BE). The following Japan Studies category courses from the E-Track Program are available to JSP students.

  • (6) Japanese Society (4 credits)
    BLACKWOOD Thomas
    16:30-18:00 (Tuesday – Friday)

    This course will offer an introduction to some of the key social institutions (families, schools, workplaces, etc.) in contemporary Japan, in light of recent and ongoing demographic and structural changes in Japanese society and political economy. Furthermore, we will also analyze mass media reports vis-à-vis rigorous scholarship to consider how empirical reality can be “spun” by the mass media to further a particular argument or contribute to the production and dissemination of particular discourses or stereotypes.

  • (7) Social Businesses in Japan (4 credits)
    STANISLAWSKI Sumire
    13:10-14:40 (Monday – Thursday)

    Social businesses are businesses that provide products and services with social, ethical, and/or environmental objectives. This course will examine the theory and practice of social businesses using Japanese businesses as case studies. Japanese consumers' responses to social businesses and their products/services will also be explored. Prior knowledge of the subject is not required.

C)Other E-Track Elective Courses open to JSP students:

In addition to the courses from the A) and B) categories, JSP students are eligible to enroll in the following E-Track courses from other categories.

  • Category Course Teacher Credit Period
    Liberal Arts Introduction to Business Management ISHIGURO 4 14:50-16:20
    (Mon-Thu)
    Introduction to Marketing TAJEDDINI 4 14:50-16:20
    (Tue-Fri)
    Introduction to International Relations IZUMI 4 14:50-16:20
    (Tue-Fri)
    Principles of Political Science YAMAMOTO 4 14:50-16:20
    (Mon-Thu)
    Introduction to Exercise Science
    (*Open Lecture taught by Willamette University visiting professor)
    (2nd quarter only)
    HARMER 2 14:50-16:20
    &
    16:30-18:00
    (Mon-Thu)
    Introduction to Philosophy
    (*Open Lecture taught by Willamette University visiting professor)
    (2nd quarter only)
    COLEMAN 2 14:50-16:20
    &
    16:30-18:00
    (Tue-Fri)
    BE Business Planning ISHIGURO 4 16:30-18:00
    (Mon-Thu)
    Macroeconomics WATANABE 4 13:10-14:40
    (Mon-Thu)
    Entrepreneurship and Innovation
    *This is an advanced course requiring prior knowledge of Business-Economics
    TAJEDDINI 4 13:10-14:40
    (Tue-Fri)
    Human Resources Management
    *This is an advanced course requiring prior knowledge of Business-Economics
    ISHIGURO 4 13:10-14:40
    (Mon-Thu)
    IR Comparative Politics YAMAMOTO 4 16:30-18:00
    (Mon-Thu)
    International Integration
    *This is an advanced course requiring prior knowledge of International Relations
    KIM 4 13:10-14:40
    (Mon-Thu)
    Qualitative Research Methods
    *This is an advanced course requiring prior knowledge of International Relations
    BLACKWOOD 4 13:10-14:40
    (Tue-Fri)



    *Note: C) category course descriptions will be provided at a later date.

Fall2016

JSP Elective Courses:

  • (1) Buddhism Traditions (4 credits)
    DROTT Edward
    13:10-14:40 & 14:50-16:20 (Friday)

    This course will provide students with a thorough introduction to the breadth and depth of the Buddhist tradition, tracing its complex pattern of dissemination throughout Asia. The course will follow Buddhism’s growth chronologically, giving a basic outline of pre-Buddhist South Asian religion, the Buddha’s biography, basic Buddhist philosophy, the development of the tripitaka, early practices, the rise of Theravāda, Mahāyāna and Vajrayāna, the development of new sects and movements in Central and East Asia, and “modernist” attempts to rework the tradition from the nineteenth century forward.

  • (2) Introduction to Community in Japan (4 credits)
    YUNOUE Chiharu
    13:10-14:40 & 14:50-16:20 (Tuesday)

    What does community/neighborhood mean in Japan? This course will introduce a wide variety of topics on community building efforts and community-based problem solving in Japan. A large number of neighborhoods in Japan have experienced various issues, such as urbanization, aging, depopulation, natural disasters, and so on. In this course, we will explore various strategies employed for overcoming these challenges, and consider what makes neighborhoods vibrant, inclusive, and healthy. The topics also include activities of organizations and community-based elder care in Japan. The course uses a seminar format. Students are expected to participate in class discussions on articles and a variety of visual materials, such as videos and photos, seen in class. No prerequisite.

  • (3) Japanese Design History after 1868 (4 credits)
    KAKUYAMA Tomoko
    14:50-16:20 & 16:30-18:00 (Wednesday)

    Design is an interactive action among human beings, materials and societies. There are various factors and ideologies that affect design, such as economy, nationalism, feminism, mass culture etc. Focusing on Japan’s modern design history after 1868, this course investigates the formation of Japanese people’s life-world. Not only its stylistic character and functional matters, we will look into “design” as a social activity from historical perspective, and discuss the modernization and westernization process of Japan. The main subjects are handicrafts, industrial products, graphic works, and the architecture of 1868-1945. Contemporary topics will be also referred in the course.

  • (4) The Soft Power of Cool Japan (4 credits)
    CLOSE Natalie
    13:10-14:40 & 14:50-16:20 (Thursday)

    In 2010 the Japanese government formally implemented a strategy called ‘Cool Japan’, which aims at increasing Japan’s influence in the world through a process known as soft power. This course will investigate how this strategy developed and was eventually adopted by the government. We will look into the various forms of Cool Japan including anime, manga, gaming, and fashion, as well as some of the less well-known areas from a historical perspective. In addition, we will look at the contemporary status of popular culture both in Japan and globally, critically examine the success of the Cool Japan program, and discuss what the future may hold. Overall, this course will raise students’ critical awareness of a variety of cultural and social issues related to modern Japan in the 21st century.